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Future Indefinite Tense, Examples, Exercises Made Easy Now

future indefinite tense

What is the future indefinite tense?

The future indefinite tense, also known as the future simple tense, is a grammatical construction used to express actions or events that will happen in the future. This tense allows us to discuss plans, predictions, intentions, or future possibilities. In the future indefinite tense, the verb is modified to indicate that the action will occur at a later time.

Let’s explore future indefinite tense examples:

Explanation: This sentence conveys a plan or intention for the future. The speaker expresses their desire to explore various parts of the world and uncover valuable gems or experiences. It implies that the speaker has a strong aspiration to embark on a global adventure.

  • She will become a renowned artist and exhibit her masterpieces.

Explanation: This sentence expresses a prediction or a future possibility. It suggests that the person referred to as “she” has the potential to achieve great artistic recognition. The speaker anticipates that she will gain fame as an artist and showcase her exceptional creations to the world.

  • They will start a revolution and change the course of history.

Explanation: This sentence portrays a future possibility or an intended action with significant consequences. It indicates that a group of individuals plans to initiate a revolution, aiming to reshape the course of history.

  • We will build a sustainable future by adopting renewable energy.

Explanation: This sentence conveys a future intention or plan. It suggests that the collective “we” aim to construct a sustainable future by embracing renewable sources of energy. It implies a commitment to environmental preservation and a desire to reduce dependence on non-renewable resources.

  • The sun will set, painting the sky with vibrant hues.

Explanation: This sentence describes a future event that is bound to happen. It highlights the natural occurrence of the sun setting and its visual impact on the sky, creating a stunning display of vibrant colors. It implies that this phenomenon is a regular and predictable part of nature.

Read about: Why is the English language so hard to learn?

Here is a more detailed explanation of the usage of “will” and “shall” in future tense:

  1. Will” is the most common auxiliary verb used to form the future tense in English.
  • It is used with all subjects (I, you, he, she, it, we, and they) to express future actions, predictions, intentions, or promises.
  1. Shall” is used less frequently in modern English and is typically associated with formal or legal contexts.
  • It is used with the subjects “I” and “we” to indicate future actions and make suggestions, offers, or requests.
  • In British English, “shall” is sometimes used with other subjects to indicate future actions, but this usage is less common in American English.

In everyday spoken English, “will” is more commonly used in all situations, regardless of the subject. The use of “shall” is typically limited to formal or legal contexts.

Avoiding Common Mistakes in the Future Indefinite Tense

The future is a vast and exciting landscape, but expressing it accurately in language can sometimes feel like navigating a minefield. The future indefinite tense, also known as the simple future tense, is a powerful tool for talking about what’s to come. However, common pitfalls can trip up even the most confident speaker. In this article, we’ll tackle two of the most frequent mistakes associated with the future indefinite tense: confusing it with the present continuous and misusing “will” and “shall.”

1. Present Continuous vs. Future Indefinite: A Tale of Two Tenses

While both tenses deal with events not happening in the present moment, their purposes and applications differ significantly.

Present continuous describes ongoing actions or events:

  • Example: “I am cooking dinner right now.” (The action of cooking is happening at the moment of speaking.)

Future indefinite talks about actions or events that will happen in the future:

  • Example: “I will cook dinner tonight.” (The action of cooking will occur later in the day.)

Here’s a table summarizing the key differences:

Feature Present Continuous Future Indefinite
Time of the action Present (ongoing or planned soon) Future (specific or unspecified)
Verb form Subject + “be” (am/is/are) + present participle (-ing) Subject + “will” + base verb
Examples “She is studying right now.” “She will study tomorrow.”

Avoiding the trap:

  • Think about the timing: Does the action happen now, soon, or later in the future?
  • Check the verb form: Is it in the present participle (-ing) form or the base form?

Example: “She is studying for her exam right now, but she will pass it next week.” (Here, “is studying” is present continuous, and “will pass” is future indefinite.)

2. “Will” vs. “Shall”: Unmasking the Mystery

While both “will” and “shall” can be used to express the future, they have distinct roles:

“Will” is the most common future auxiliary verb. It signifies a general prediction, promise, or intention:

  • Example: “He will travel to Europe next year.” (A general prediction)
  • Example: “I will help you with the project.” (A promise)
  • Example: “We will try our best to win the competition.” (An intention)

“Shall” is less common in modern English. Its use has become primarily limited to:

  • Making offers or suggestions:

  • Example: “Shall we go for a movie?” (Offering a suggestion)

  • Formal promises or threats: (Less common in everyday speech)

  • Example: “You shall be punished for your actions.” (Formal threat)

“Shall” is also used with first-person pronouns (I, we) in formal questions, though “will” is becoming increasingly acceptable:

  • Formal: “Shall I open the window?”
  • More common: “Will I open the window?”

Avoiding the confusion:

  • For most situations, “will” is the safer choice.
  • Reserve “shall” for formal contexts or specific situations mentioned above.

Example:Will you be attending the meeting tomorrow?” (“Will” is appropriate in this question.)

Advanced Adventures in the Future: Exploring Nuances of the Indefinite Tense

We’ve conquered the common pitfalls of the future indefinite tense, but our journey doesn’t end there. Let’s delve deeper into its advanced usage to unlock its full potential.

1. “Going to” – A Peek into Future Predictions and Intentions:

While “will” reigns supreme for general future predictions, “going to” offers another powerful tool. It expresses:

  • Strong predictions based on present evidence:

  • Example: “It is going to rain later today. Look at those dark clouds!”

  • Intentions and plans:

  • Example: “I am going to volunteer at the animal shelter this weekend.”

Key points about “going to”:

  • It often signifies an already existing plan or decision.
  • It can imply a sense of certainty or inevitability, especially with strong present evidence.

2. Simple Future vs. Future Perfect: Charting the Timeline:

Both tenses deal with the future, but they paint different pictures regarding the timeframe:

  • Simple future (will): Focuses on actions that will occur at some point in the future, with no specific timeframe:

  • Example: “The team will win the championship.” (Doesn’t mention when)

  • Future perfect (will have + past participle): Emphasizes the completion of an action before another future point in time:

  • Example: By next year, she will have finished writing her novel. (Action of finishing will be completed before next year)

Here’s a table summarizing the key differences:

Feature Simple Future Future Perfect
Focus Action in the future Completion before another future event
Verb form Subject + “will” + base verb Subject + “will have” + past participle
Timeframe No specific timeframe Action completed before a future point
Examples “He will visit his grandparents next summer.” “By the time I return, they will have finished painting the house.”

Remember:

  • “Will” alone is sufficient for future predictions without specific completion deadlines.
  • Use “will have” + past participle when you need to highlight the completion aspect before another future event.

The structure of a sentence in the future indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

Subject + will + base form of the verb + objective

To form the future indefinite tense, we use the auxiliary verb “will” before the base form of the verb. This structure applies to both regular and irregular verbs.

Let’s learn the possibilities and construct sentences in the future indefinite tense with finesse and flair:

Examples:

  1. I will conquer my fears and embrace new challenges.
  2. She will establish a sanctuary for endangered species.
  3. They will create a masterpiece that transcends time.
  4. We will explore distant galaxies and unravel cosmic mysteries.
  5. He will revolutionize the world with his groundbreaking invention.

How do we make negative sentences with the future indefinite?

In negative sentences in the future indefinite tense, we use the auxiliary verb “will not” or its contracted form “won’t” before the base form of the main verb.

Sentence structure

subject + will not/won’t + verb (base form) + objective

For example, in the sentence:

I will go to the party; the base form of the verb is “go.”

To make it negative, we add “will not” or “won’t” before the base form of the verb: I will not go to the party, or I won’t go to the party.

Similarly, in the sentence:

He will finish his work; the base form of the verb is “finish.”

To make it negative, we add “will not” or “won’t” before the base form of the verb: he will not finish his work or he won’t finish his work.

Examples:

  • I will not travel to Europe next month.
  • She won’t attend the meeting tomorrow.
  • They will not buy a new car.
  • I will not be available for the appointment.
  • They will not finish the project on time.

Explore: The 12 basic English tenses

How do we make interrogative sentences with the future indefinite?

When we make interrogative sentences in the future indefinite tense, we use the auxiliary verb “will” before the subject, followed by the base form of the main verb.

Sentence structure

Will + subject + verb (base form) + objective?

Examples:

  • Will she join the team?
  • Will you come to the party?
  • Will they win the competition?
  • Will he finish his work on time?

To form interrogative sentences in the future indefinite tense, we invert the subject and the auxiliary verb “will” and add a question mark at the end of the sentence.

Examples:

  • Will you travel to Europe next month?
  • Will she attend the meeting tomorrow?
  • Will they complete the task before the deadline?
  • Will they buy a new car? Will I be able to join the event?

How do we make negative interrogative sentences with the future indefinite?

To make negative interrogative sentences with the future indefinite tense, you can use the following sentence structure:

Sentence structure

Will + subject + not + verb (base form)?

Examples:

  • Will birds not fly in the sky?
  • Will she not work at a bank?
  • Will she not study every night?
  • Will the sun not rise in the east?
  • Will they not like classical music?
  • Will she not play tennis every day?
  • Will children not learn through play?
  • Will he not drive to work every day?
  • Will plants not need sunlight to grow?
  • Will they not travel abroad frequently?
  • Will John not have a class on Sundays?
  • Will you not watch the news in the morning?
  • Will the water not freeze at 0 degrees Celsius?

Learn about: Parts of speech | Introduction | interesting short stories | exercise

How do we make tag sentences with the future indefinite?

To make tag sentences with the future indefinite tense, you can use the following sentence structure:

Sentence structure

Subject + will + (not) + verb (base form) + auxiliary verb?

Examples:

  • You will love pizza, won’t you?
  • Birds will fly in the sky, won’t they?
  • We will study every night, won’t we?
  • Who will teach this class, won’t they?
  • The sun will rise in the east, won’t it?
  • He will speak French fluently, won’t he?
  • She will play tennis every day, won’t she?
  • They will like classical music, won’t they?
  • Children will learn through play, won’t they?
  • Plants will need sunlight to grow, won’t they?
  • Water will freeze at 0 degrees Celsius, won’t it?
  • Who will work hard to achieve their goals, won’t they?
  • They will visit their grandparents regularly, won’t they?
  • Who will read books before bed every night, won’t they?

Examples of sentences using the question word “who” in the future indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

Who + will + subject + verb (base form) + objective

Examples:

  • Who will design the new company logo?
  • Who will organize the charity event next month?
  • Who will lead the team on the upcoming project?
  • Who will manage the construction of the new building?
  • Who will deliver the keynote speech at the conference?
  • Who will direct the play in the school theater production?
  • Who will develop the software for the upcoming application?
  • Who will represent the company at the international trade fair?
  • Who will coach the basketball team in the championship game?
  • Who will coordinate the marketing campaign for the product launch?

Examples of sentences using the question word “what” in the future indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

What + will + subject + verb (base form) + objective

Examples:

  • What will grow in the garden?
  • What will be the capital of this country?
  • What will help plants to photosynthesize?
  • What would you like to do in your free time?
  • What will cause the changing of seasons?

Examples of sentences using the question word “when” in the future indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

When + will + subject + verb (base form) + objective

Examples:

  • When do you
  • Sually have lunch?
  • When will the library close?
  • When will the train arrive at the station?
  • When will the next meeting be scheduled?
  • When will the leaves change color in the fall?

Learn about: From Nouns to Verbs | The Building Blocks of Sentences

Examples of sentences using the question word “where” in the future indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

Where +there is + subject + verb (base form) + will + objective

Examples:

  • Where there is light, plants will grow.
  • Where there is water, there will be life.
  • Where there is heat, energy will be produced.
  • Where there is love, there will be happiness.
  • Where there is wind, it can cause movement or change.

future indefinite tense

Examples of sentences using the question word “why” in the future indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

Why + will + subject + verb (base form) + objective

Examples:

  • Why will he be late?
  • Why would you like this color?
  • Why will you study for exams?
  • Why will people need to drink water?
  • Why will leaves change color in the fall?

Examples of sentences using the question word “how” in the future indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

How + will + subject + verb (base form) + objective

  • How will a car engine work?
  • How will you cook this dish?
  • How will you get to work every day?
  • How will you solve this math problem?
  • How will photosynthesis occur in plants?

Find out about Adjectives and Adverbs | Explore the Ultimate Guide Now

Fill in the blanks with the correct form of a verb given in the brackets.

Here are the sentences rewritten as multiple-choice questions (MCQs) with three answer options for each blank:

  1. He will take a nap. a) Take; b) Take; c) Take
  2. He will go to work. a) drive; b) drive; c) drive
  3. We will make a trip. a) taken; b) took; c) take
  4. We will have a picnic. a) had; b) has; c) have
  5. He will ride his bike. a) riding; b) rider; c) rides
  6. She will write a book. a) read;er; b) read; c) read
  7. I will have breakfast. a) eating; b) eating; c) eating
  8. We will have a meeting. a) had; b) having; c) have
  9. You will play the guitar. a) plays; b) playss; c) plays
  10. I will __________ coffee. a) drank b) drinks c) drink
  11. They will play soccer. a) played; b) played; c) played
  12. You will take a class. a) attends; b) attends; c) attends
  13. She will be at the party. a) dance; b) dance; c) dances
  14. They will play video games. a) plays; b) playss; c) plays
  15. He will _____ at a company. a) work; b) work; c) works
  16. It will __________ heavily. a) rained; b) raining; c) rains
  17. We will __________ to the park. a) went b) going c) go
  18. I will go to the store. a) walking; b) walkinging; c) walking
  19. She will __________ a letter. a) writer b) writing c) writes
  20. She will __________ in the choir. a) sing; b) sing; c) sing
  21. I will __________ at night. a) sleeps; b) sleeps; c) sleeps
  22. I will __________ in the morning. a) running; b) runs; c) runs
  23. You will watch a movie. a) watched; b) watched; c) watched
  24. She will __________ in the pool. a) swim; b) swim; c) swim
  25. He will __________ to music. a) listened b) listen c) listens
  26. It will __________ heavily. a) snowing; b) snowed; c) snows
  27. He will __________ dinner. a) cooking; b) cooked; c) cooks
  28. They will watch television. a) watched; b) watched; c) watched
  29. He will __________ for his exam. a) student; b) study; c) studies
  30. They will __________ their grandparents. a) visitor b) visits c) visit

Read about: How to Use Prepositions of Time in English: A Complete Guide

References:

Furthermore, for your guidance, we have provided here some common resources related to this tense:

Grammar Websites: Numerous websites will provide comprehensive explanations, examples, and exercises to help learners understand and use the future indefinite tense correctly.

Online Courses: Platforms will offer various English grammar courses, including modules or lessons dedicated to the simple present tense. These courses will often provide interactive learning experiences, quizzes, and assignments.

Language Learning Apps: Mobile applications will offer language courses and exercises covering different aspects of grammar, including the future indefinite tense.

YouTube Tutorials: Many language enthusiasts and educators will create video tutorials on YouTube, explaining grammar concepts like the simple present tense. These videos will often provide clear explanations, examples, and practice exercises.

Grammar Books and E-books: There will be numerous grammar books available, both in physical and digital formats, that will cover the fundamentals of English grammar, including the future indefinite tense.

Online Forums and Communities: Language learning forums or language exchange platforms will often have threads or discussions dedicated to grammar topics. Users will be able to ask questions, seek clarification, and engage with fellow learners and teachers.

EnglishClub: Tenses: EnglishClub will offer a comprehensive guide to English tenses, including explanations, examples, and interactive exercises. Visit their website at: https://www.englishclub.com/grammar/verb-tenses.htm

Grammarly: Verb Tenses: Grammarly’s website will provide a clear overview of English verb tenses, with explanations, examples, and usage tips. You will be able to access their resources here: https://www.grammarly.com/blog/verb-tenses/

British Council: Verb Tenses: The British Council’s website will offer a range of materials and interactive activities to help learners understand and practice English verb tenses. https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/grammar/intermediate-to-upper-intermediate/verb-patterns

Englishpage.com: Verb Tenses Tutorial: Englishpage.com will provide a comprehensive tutorial on English verb tenses, covering each tense in detail with explanations and interactive quizzes.  https://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbtenseintro.html

Perfect English Grammar – Tenses: Perfect English Grammar will offer a variety of resources, including explanations, examples, and exercises, to help learners master English tenses. https://www.perfect-english-grammar.com/tenses.html

We will recommend some popular books that cover English tenses and grammar in general. Here are a few recommendations:

“English Grammar in Use” by Raymond Murphy: This book will be a comprehensive guide to English grammar, including detailed explanations and exercises for each grammar point, including tenses.

“Understanding and Using English Grammar” by Betty Schrampfer Azar and Stacy A. Hagen This book will provide a thorough overview of English grammar, including tenses, with clear explanations and ample examples.

“Practical English Usage” by Michael Swan: This book will be a practical reference guide for English learners and will cover a wide range of grammar topics, including tenses, clearly and concisely.

“The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Grammar and Style” by Laurie E. Rozakis This book will offer a beginner-friendly approach to grammar, including tenses, with explanations, examples, and exercises.

“Grammar in Plain English” by Harriet Diamond and Phyllis Dutwin: This book will present grammar rules, including tenses, in a straightforward and accessible manner, making it suitable for self-study.

Written by M Manawar Zia

He has extensive expertise in strategic marketing and business development, backed by over two decades of leadership in top-tier multinational organizations. His track record includes successful implementation of marketing best practices, alignment with organizational objectives, and leading high-performing teams. Additionally, Manawar hold ISO certifications and have received academic awards in fields such as marketing management, organizational behavior, and socio-economic studies.

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