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Present Indefinite Tense, Examples, Exercises Made Easy Now

present indefinite tense, examples

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Present Indefinite Tense, Examples

The present indefinite tense, examples are explained here, as they are formed by using the base form of the verb (without “to”) after the subject of the sentence. The present indefinite tense, also known as the present simple, is used to describe actions or states that are currently happening or are always true. So in

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You can understand them from examples of sentences in the present indefinite tense, including:

This verb form lets you talk about things you do regularly or facts that are always true.

Examples

  • Most verbs stay in their base form (write, talk, play).
  • Third-person singular (he, she, it) adds an “s” for action (writes, talks, plays).
  • Some verbs (go, watch, do) add “es” in the third-person singular (goes, watches, does).

Examples:

  • Daily habits: I brush my teeth twice a day. She plays the piano every evening.
  • General truths: The sun rises in the east. The earth revolves around the sun.

The structure of a sentence in the present indefinite tense is typically

To form the Present Indefinite Tense in English, there are a few key rules to follow. With most regular verbs, the formation is straightforward, except for the third-person singular.

Sentence structure

subject + verb (base form) + objective

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to form the Present Indefinite Tense:

  1. For regular verbs (verbs that follow typical conjugation patterns), use the base form or root form of the verb. This base form remains unchanged for all subjects except the third-person singular.
  2. For the third-person singular (he, she, it), add an -s or -es to the base form of the verb. The specific ending (-s or -es) depends on the spelling of the verb.
    • If the base form of the verb ends in -s, -ss, -sh, -ch, -x, or -z, add -es to the end. For example:
      • He eats an apple every day.
      • She passes the ball to her teammate.
    • If the base form of the verb ends in any other letter, simply add -s to the end. For example:
      • She plays the piano beautifully.
      • He runs in the park every morning.
  3. For irregular verbs (verbs that do not follow the regular conjugation patterns), the forms of the Present Indefinite Tense vary. It is necessary to memorize the specific forms of irregular verbs since they do not follow a consistent pattern.
    • Examples of irregular verbs in the Present Indefinite Tense:
      • I have a car. (have – irregular verb)
      • They go to school. (go – irregular verb)

Unveiling the Secrets: Mastering the Art of Forming the Simple Present

Ever wondered how we talk about things we do every day? The simple present tense is your secret weapon! Here’s how it works:

Most Regular Verbs:

  • Imagine most verbs are like friendly robots. They usually stay in their “base form” (like “write,” “talk,” “play”).
  • But in the third-person singular (he, she, it), a special “s” appears like a tiny superhero cape, helping the verb show who’s doing the action.

Examples:

  • I write stories. (Base form)
  • You write too! (Base form)
  • He/She/It writes a letter every day. (Base form + “s”)
  • They write songs for the school play. (Base form + “s”)

A Few Special Verbs:

  • Some verbs like “go,” “do,” “watch,” and “wish” have a secret trick. When they meet the third-person singular, they add an “es” instead of just “s.” It’s like a magic trick that makes them sound a bit different!

Examples:

  • I go to school. (Base form)
  • You go to the park. (Base form)
  • He/She/It goes swimming every morning. (Base form + “es”)

Saying “No” (Negatives):

  • To say “no” in the simple present, we use a special helper word like “don’t” or “doesn’t.” It’s like putting a little “not allowed” sign in front of the verb.

Examples:

  • I don’t eat vegetables! (Base form + “don’t”)
  • She doesn’t like loud music. (Base form + “doesn’t”)

The Verb “To Be” (A Special Case):

  • The verb “to be” (am, is, are) is a bit different. It has its own special way of changing depending on who or what is doing the action. Remember these for now, and we’ll learn more about them later!

Examples:

  • I am happy.
  • You are my friend.

Learn Future Continuous Tense, Examples & Exercises Made Easy Now

Unleashing the Power: Harnessing the Versatility of the Present Indefinite Tense

The Present Indefinite Tense, also known as the Simple Present Tense, is one of the fundamental tenses in the English language. Moreover, it is used to describe actions, events, or situations that are general, habitual, or regularly occurring. Here are some common uses of the Present Indefinite Tense:
  1. General truths or facts: The Present Indefinite Tense is used to express general truths, principles, or facts that are not limited to a specific time or situation. For example:
    • Water boils at 100 degrees Celsius.
    • The Earth revolves around the sun.
  2. Habits and routines: This tense is used to describe habitual actions or routines. It signifies activities that occur repeatedly or regularly. For example:
    • I wake up at 6 a.m. every morning.
    • He drinks coffee after dinner.
  3. Scheduled events: The present indefinite tense can be used to talk about future events that are part of a fixed schedule or timetable. For example:
    • The train departs at 9 p.m. tonight.
    • This concert starts at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday.
  4. Instructions or directions: It is commonly used in instructions, recipes, or directions to indicate a sequence of actions or steps. For example:
    • Mix the ingredients in a bowl, then bake for 30 minutes.
    • Take two tablets with water after meals.
  5. General statements or descriptions: The present indefinite tense is used to make general statements or describe characteristics of people, things, or situations. For example:
    • Cats are independent animals.
    • The sky appears blue during the day.

Learn The 12 basic English tenses

How do I explain a situation in life in the present indefinite tense?

The present indefinite tense is used to describe a general or ongoing situation or fact in the present. Here are some examples of how to use it to explain a situation in life:

Examples:

  • People breathe in oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide.
  • The earth revolves around the sun.
  • Birds migrate to warmer climates during the winter.

Learn Basic Writing Exercises | Sharpen Your Skills for Occasions

How do make affirmative sentences with the present indefinite?

We use the base form of the verb with the subject to form affirmative sentences in the present indefinite tense. You can see the following examples:.

Sentence structure

subject + verb (base form with s or es) + objective

In the present indefinite tense, we add “s” to the verb for third-person singular subjects (he, she, it or name), and “es” for certain verbs that end in “s,” “sh,” “ch,” “x,” or “z.”

For example:

  • He walks to school every day. (adds “s” to “walk”)
  • She watches TV every night. (adds “s” to “watch”)
  • It rains a lot in the spring. (adds “s” to “rain”)

How do we make negative sentences with present indefinite?

In negative sentences in the present indefinite tense, examples. we use the auxiliary verb “do/does” along with the base form of the main verb.

Sentence structure

subject + does/do + verb (base form without s or es) + objective

For example, in the sentence

I like chocolate, the base form of the verb is “like.”

To make it negative, we add “do not” (or “don’t”) before the base form of the verb: I do not like chocolate.

Similarly, in the sentence

He plays basketball, the base form of the verb is “plays.”

To make it negative, we add “does not” (or “doesn’t”) before the base form of the verb: He does not play basketball.

The form of “do” or “does” in the negative sentence is determined by the subject. We use “do” with I, you, we, and they and “does” with he, she, and it.

How do I make interrogative sentences with present indefinite tense?

When we make present indefinite interrogative sentences, we use the auxiliary verb “do/does” before the subject, which is followed by the base form of the main verb.

Sentence structure

Does/Do + subject + verb (base form without s or es) + objective

Examples:

  • Do you like chocolate?
  • Does he play basketball?
  • Do they speak Spanish?

The form of “do” or “does” in the interrogative sentence is determined by the subject, just like in negative sentences. We use “do” with I, you, we, and they, and “does” with he, she, and it.

To form interrogative sentences in the present indefinite, we invert the subject and the auxiliary verb (or “be” when the “be” verb is used) and add a question mark at the end of the sentence.

Examples:

  • Do you walk to work every day?
  • Does she speak Spanish fluently?
  • Do they eat dinner at 6 o’clock?

Learn 100 Sentences for Beginners | Made English Learning Easy

How do I make negative interrogative sentences with the present indefinite?

To make negative interrogative sentences with the present indefinite tense.

Sentence structure

Do/Does + subject + not + verb base form.

Examples:

  • Do birds not fly in the sky?
  • Does the water not freeze at 0 degrees Celsius?

How do I make tag sentences with the present indefinite tense, examples?

Tag sentences are short questions added to the end of a statement to confirm or clarify information.

Sentence structure

subject + verb (base form with s or es) + (not) + auxiliary verb

Examples:

  • She plays tennis every day, doesn’t she?
  • He speaks French fluently, doesn’t he?

Examples of sentences using the question word “who” in the present indefinite tense:

Sentence structure:

Who + verb (base form without s or es) + objective

Who + does + subject + verb (base form) + objective

Examples:

  • Who grows flowers in the garden?
  • Who do you admire in your field?

Examples of sentences using the question word “what” in the present indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

What + verb (base form without s or es) + objective

What + do/does + subject + verb (base form) + objective

Examples:

  • What grows in the garden?
  • What do you like to do in your free time?

Examples of sentences using the question word “when” in the present indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

When + verb (base form without s or es) + objective

When + do/does + subject + verb (base form) + objective

  • When does the library close?
  • When is the next meeting scheduled?

Examples of sentences using the question word “where” in the present indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

Where + subject + verb (base form without s or es) + objective

Examples:

  • Where there is light, plants grow.
  • Where there is water, there is life.

Sentence structure

Where + do/does + subject + verb (base form) + objective

Examples:

  • Where does the river begin?
  • Where do you live?

Examples of sentences using the question word “why” in the present indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

Why + do/does + subject + verb (base form) + objective

Examples:

  • Why do people need to drink water?
  • Why do you think he’s late?

Examples of sentences using the question word “how” in the present indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

How + do/does + subject + verb (base form) + objective

Examples:

  • How does photosynthesis occur in plants?
  • How do you get to work every day?

Fill in the blanks with the correct form of a verb given in the brackets.

  1. I ______________ to the store. (walking, walked, walk)
  2. She ______________ a book. (reader, read, reads)
  3. They ______________ soccer. (played, playing, play)
  4. He ______________ at a company. (work, worked, works)
  5. It ______________ heavily. (rained, raining, rains)

Note: The correct answers have been given in italic font.

Review of some sentences in present indefinite tense, examples

Below are some interesting and commonly used sentences in present indefinite tense. You can practice with them by making negative, interrogative, negative interrogative, tag questions and other sentences as mentioned above. This will help you understand this tense in a more effective manner.

  1. I travel the world for a living
  2. She paints abstract art
  3. They design sustainable buildings
  4. He builds custom motorcycles
  5. It blooms with colourful flowers every spring
  6. We explore ancient ruins
  7. You create digital music
  8. She trains for a marathon
  9. He studies the stars as an astronomer
  10. I run a small business

Written by M Manawar Zia

He has extensive expertise in strategic marketing and business development, backed by over two decades of leadership in top-tier multinational organizations. His track record includes successful implementation of marketing best practices, alignment with organizational objectives, and leading high-performing teams. Additionally, Manawar hold ISO certifications and have received academic awards in fields such as marketing management, organizational behavior, and socio-economic studies.

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