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Present Indefinite Tense, Examples, Exercises Made Easy Now

present indefinite tense, examples

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Present Indefinite Tense, Examples

The present indefinite tense, examples are explained here, as they are formed by using the base form of the verb (without “to”) after the subject of the sentence. The present indefinite tense, also known as the present simple, is used to describe actions or states that are currently happening or are always true. So in
You can understand them from examples of sentences in the present indefinite tense, including:
Examples
  • I walk to work every day.
  • She speaks French fluently.
  • He goes to the market alone.
  • We write on the white board.
  • She speaks English fluently.
  • They live in New York City.

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Always remember that the present indefinite tense is also used to describe general truths, habits, and regular actions. See the following examples:

  • The sun rises in the east.

Explanation: This sentence describes a general truth. It states a fact that is universally true, regardless of the specific time or situation. The sun consistently rises in the east.

  • Dogs bark when they are excited or scared.

Explanation: This sentence describes a habit or regular action. It states that dogs bark as a response to specific emotions or situations. It implies that barking is a common behavior observed in dogs when they experience excitement or fear.

  • I brush my teeth twice a day.

Explanation: This sentence describes a habit or regular action. It states the frequency at which the speaker brushes their teeth, indicating that they engage in this activity two times every day. It implies that brushing teeth is a regular practice for the speaker.

  • She plays the piano every evening.

Explanation: This sentence describes a habit or regular action. It indicates that the person referred to as “she” regularly engages in playing the piano during the evening. It suggests that playing the piano is a common activity for her, occurring on a daily basis.

  • The earth revolves around the sun.

Explanation: This sentence describes a general truth. It states a scientific fact about the Earth’s movement, indicating that the Earth revolves around the sun. It represents a universally accepted truth based on scientific knowledge.

Learn Past Simple Tense: Explore Now The Ultimate Guide

The structure of a sentence in the present indefinite tense is typically

To form the Present Indefinite Tense in English, there are a few key rules to follow. With most regular verbs, the formation is straightforward, except for the third-person singular.

Sentence structure

subject + verb (base form) + objective

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to form the Present Indefinite Tense:

  1. For regular verbs (verbs that follow typical conjugation patterns), use the base form or root form of the verb. This base form remains unchanged for all subjects except the third-person singular.
  2. For the third-person singular (he, she, it), add an -s or -es to the base form of the verb. The specific ending (-s or -es) depends on the spelling of the verb.
    • If the base form of the verb ends in -s, -ss, -sh, -ch, -x, or -z, add -es to the end. For example:
      • He eats an apple every day.
      • She passes the ball to her teammate.
      • The bus rushes by the station.
      • He fixes the broken chair.
    • If the base form of the verb ends in any other letter, simply add -s to the end. For example:
      • She plays the piano beautifully.
      • He runs in the park every morning.
      • The cat jumps onto the table.
  3. For irregular verbs (verbs that do not follow the regular conjugation patterns), the forms of the Present Indefinite Tense vary. It is necessary to memorize the specific forms of irregular verbs since they do not follow a consistent pattern.
    • Examples of irregular verbs in the Present Indefinite Tense:
      • I have a car. (have – irregular verb)
      • They go to school. (go – irregular verb)
      • She does her homework. (do – irregular verb)

Unveiling the Secrets: Mastering the Art of Forming the Simple Present

In the realm of the simple present, behold the majesty of most regular verbs as they embrace their root form, only to reveal a delightful twist in the third-person singular, where a charming “s” graces their presence.

Witness the symphony of conjugation:

First-person singular: I write, for I am the author of my own words.

Second-person singular: You write, as you pen your own destiny.

Third-person singular: He/she/it writes, with an elegant “s” dancing upon their every stroke. (Take note of this enchanted letter!)

First-person plural: We write, united in our creative endeavors.

Second-person plural: You write, a collective force shaping the narrative.

Third-person plural: They write, leaving an indelible mark upon the world.

But lo, a few verbs possess a captivating spell, where the third-person singular dons “es” instead of a simple “s”. Listen closely to their enchanting whispers, for their roots end in the mystical letters of o, ch, sh, th, ss, gh, or z.

First-person singular: I go, venturing forth on my daring odyssey.

Second-person singular: You go, exploring the boundless paths that lie before you.

Third-person singular: He/she/it goes, a mesmerizing transformation graced by the elusive “es”.

First-person plural: We go, embarking on grand adventures together.

Second-person plural: You go, a fellowship of wanderers forging your own trails.

Third-person plural: They go, a tapestry of journeys woven across the landscape.

In the realm of negation, where shadows embrace the light, most regular verbs find their solace as the negation cloak drapes before their presence. Behold the magnificent dance of words:

She won’t go,” whispers the wind.

I don’t smell anything,” proclaim the senses.

Yet, the verb to be stands as an enigma, shattering the rules with its irregular charm:

First-person singular: I am, an affirmation of my existence.

Second-person singular: You are a beacon of identity.

Third-person singular: He/she/it is a mesmerizing union of essence.

First-person plural: We are a harmonious tapestry of souls.

Second-person plural: You are a collective embodiment of purpose.

Third-person plural: They are a symphony echoing through eternity.

Embrace the nuances of the simple present, where words create realms and realities and the dance of language unveils its timeless allure.

Learn Future Continuous Tense, Examples & Exercises Made Easy Now

Unleashing the Power: Harnessing the Versatility of the Present Indefinite Tense

The Present Indefinite Tense, also known as the Simple Present Tense, is one of the fundamental tenses in the English language. Moreover, it is used to describe actions, events, or situations that are general, habitual, or regularly occurring. Here are some common uses of the Present Indefinite Tense:
  1. General truths or facts: The Present Indefinite Tense is used to express general truths, principles, or facts that are not limited to a specific time or situation. For example:
    • Water boils at 100 degrees Celsius.
    • The Earth revolves around the sun.
  2. Habits and routines: This tense is used to describe habitual actions or routines. It signifies activities that occur repeatedly or regularly. For example:
    • I wake up at 6 a.m. every morning.
    • He drinks coffee after dinner.
  3. Scheduled events: The present indefinite tense can be used to talk about future events that are part of a fixed schedule or timetable. For example:
    • The train departs at 9 p.m. tonight.
    • This concert starts at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday.
  4. Instructions or directions: It is commonly used in instructions, recipes, or directions to indicate a sequence of actions or steps. For example:
    • Mix the ingredients in a bowl, then bake for 30 minutes.
    • Take two tablets with water after meals.
  5. General statements or descriptions: The present indefinite tense is used to make general statements or describe characteristics of people, things, or situations. For example:
    • Cats are independent animals.
    • The sky appears blue during the day.

The present indefinite tense is not limited to the present time; it can also be used to express future events or actions that are part of a fixed schedule. Hence, the context and adverbs of time clarify the specific time frame in which the action occurs.

Learn The 12 basic English tenses

How do I explain a situation in life in the present indefinite tense?

The present indefinite tense is used to describe a general or ongoing situation or fact in the present. Here are some examples of how to use it to explain a situation in life:

Examples:

  • People breathe in oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide.
  • The earth revolves around the sun.
  • Birds migrate to warmer climates during the winter.
  • Children need love and attention to grow into well-adjusted adults.
  • Most employees work 9 to 5, five days a week.
  • The sun rises in the east and sets in the west.
  • The leaves on trees change colour in the fall.
  • People communicate with each other through speech, gestures, and written words.
  • Most shops open at 9 am and close at 5 pm.
  • Rivers flow from high to low elevations.
  • Children develop physically, emotionally, and mentally as they grow older.
  • Most animals need food, water, and shelter to survive.
  • Flowers bloom in the spring.
  • Dogs bark when they are happy or excited.
  • The earth rotates on its axis once a day.
  • People use the money to buy things they need or want.
  • Clouds form when water vapour rises and condenses.
  • Humans grow taller and stronger as they get older.
  • Fish live in water and need it to survive.
  • Planes fly in the sky and can travel great distances.

Learn Basic Writing Exercises | Sharpen Your Skills for Occasions

How do make affirmative sentences with the present indefinite?

We use the base form of the verb with the subject to form affirmative sentences in the present indefinite tense. You can see the following examples:.

Sentence structure

subject + verb (base form with s or es) + objective

In the present indefinite tense, we add “s” to the verb for third-person singular subjects (he, she, it or name), and “es” for certain verbs that end in “s,” “sh,” “ch,” “x,” or “z.”

For example:

  • He walks to school every day. (adds “s” to “walk”)
  • She watches TV every night. (adds “s” to “watch”)
  • It rains a lot in the spring. (adds “s” to “rain”)
  • The bus goes to the city centre. (adds “es” to “go”)
  • He catches the ball. (adds “es” to “catch”)

Examples:

  • I walk to work every day.
  • She speaks Spanish fluently.
  • They eat dinner at 6 o’clock.

present indefinite, examples

How do we make negative sentences with present indefinite?

In negative sentences in the present indefinite tense, examples. we use the auxiliary verb “do/does” along with the base form of the main verb.

Sentence structure

subject + does/do + verb (base form without s or es) + objective

For example, in the sentence

I like chocolate, the base form of the verb is “like.”

To make it negative, we add “do not” (or “don’t”) before the base form of the verb: I do not like chocolate.

Similarly, in the sentence

He plays basketball, the base form of the verb is “plays.”

To make it negative, we add “does not” (or “doesn’t”) before the base form of the verb: He does not play basketball.

The form of “do” or “does” in the negative sentence is determined by the subject. We use “do” with I, you, we, and they and “does” with he, she, and it.

Examples:

  • I do not walk to work every day.
  • She does not speak Spanish fluently.
  • They do not eat dinner at 6 o’clock.
  • I am not happy today.
  • They are not tired after a long day at work.

How do I make interrogative sentences with present indefinite tense?

When we make present indefinite interrogative sentences, we use the auxiliary verb “do/does” before the subject, which is followed by the base form of the main verb.

Sentence structure

Does/Do + subject + verb (base form without s or es) + objective

Examples:

  • Do you like chocolate?
  • Does he play basketball?
  • Do they speak Spanish?
  • Does she go to school on Sundays?

The form of “do” or “does” in the interrogative sentence is determined by the subject, just like in negative sentences. We use “do” with I, you, we, and they, and “does” with he, she, and it.

To form interrogative sentences in the present indefinite, we invert the subject and the auxiliary verb (or “be” when the “be” verb is used) and add a question mark at the end of the sentence.

Examples:

  • Do you walk to work every day?
  • Does she speak Spanish fluently?
  • Do they eat dinner at 6 o’clock?
  • Am I happy today?
  • Are they tired after a long day at work?

Learn 100 Sentences for Beginners | Made English Learning Easy

How do I make negative interrogative sentences with the present indefinite?

To make negative interrogative sentences with the present indefinite tense.

Sentence structure

Do/Does + subject + not + verb base form.

Examples:

  • Do birds not fly in the sky?
  • Does the water not freeze at 0 degrees Celsius?
  • Do plants not need sunlight to grow?
  • Does the sun not rise in the east?
  • Do children not learn through play?
  • Does she not work at a bank?
  • Does he not drive to work every day?
  • Do they not travel abroad frequently?
  • Does John not have a class on Sundays?
  • Do you not watch the news in the morning?
  • Does she not play tennis every day?
  • Do they not like classical music?
  • Does she not study every night?
  • Do you not love pizza?

How do I make tag sentences with the present indefinite tense, examples?

Tag sentences are short questions added to the end of a statement to confirm or clarify information.

Sentence structure

subject + verb (base form with s or es) + (not) + auxiliary verb

Examples:

  • She plays tennis every day, doesn’t she?
  • He speaks French fluently, doesn’t he?
  • They like classical music, don’t they?
  • We study every night, don’t we?
  • Who visit their grandparents regularly, don’t they?
  • You love pizza, don’t you?
  • Who teaches this class, don’t they?
  • Birds fly in the sky, don’t they?
  • Who reads books before bed every night, don’t they?
  • Water freezes at 0 degrees Celsius, doesn’t it?
  • Plants need sunlight to grow, don’t they?
  • Who works hard to achieve their goals, don’t they?
  • The sun rises in the east, doesn’t it?
  • Children learn through play, don’t they?
  • Who likes to play soccer on the weekends, don’t they?

Examples of sentences using the question word “who” in the present indefinite tense:

Sentence structure:

Who + verb (base form without s or es) + objective

Who + does + subject + verb (base form) + objective

Examples:

  • Who grows flowers in the garden?
  • Who do you admire in your field?
  • Who teaches English as a second language?
  • Who runs the local community center?
  • Who helps with the organization of events?

Examples of sentences using the question word “what” in the present indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

What + verb (base form without s or es) + objective

What + do/does + subject + verb (base form) + objective

Examples:

  • What grows in the garden?
  • What do you like to do in your free time?
  • What causes the changing of seasons?
  • What is the capital of this country?
  • What helps plants to photosynthesize?

Examples of sentences using the question word “when” in the present indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

When + verb (base form without s or es) + objective

When + do/does + subject + verb (base form) + objective

  • When does the library close?
  • When is the next meeting scheduled?
  • When do the leaves change colour in the fall?
  • When do you usually have lunch?
  • When does the train arrive at the station?

Examples of sentences using the question word “where” in the present indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

Where + subject + verb (base form without s or es) + objective

Examples:

  • Where there is light, plants grow.
  • Where there is water, there is life.
  • Where there is heat, energy is produced.
  • Where there is love, there is happiness.
  • Where there is wind, it can cause movement or change.

Sentence structure

Where + do/does + subject + verb (base form) + objective

Examples:

  • Where does the river begin?
  • Where do you live?
  • Where do birds migrate to in the winter?
  • Where do you keep your keys?
  • Where do you like to go on vacation?

Examples of sentences using the question word “why” in the present indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

Why + do/does + subject + verb (base form) + objective

Examples:

  • Why do people need to drink water?
  • Why do you think he’s late?
  • Why do leaves change colour in the fall?
  • Why do you like this colour?
  • Why do you study for exams?

Examples of sentences using the question word “how” in the present indefinite tense:

Sentence structure

How + do/does + subject + verb (base form) + objective

Examples:

  • How does photosynthesis occur in plants?
  • How do you get to work every day?
  • How does a car engine work?
  • How do you cook this dish?
  • How do you solve this math problem?

Fill in the blanks with the correct form of a verb given in the brackets.

  1. I ______________ to the store. (walking, walked, walk)
  2. She ______________ a book. (reader, read, reads)
  3. They ______________ soccer. (played, playing, play)
  4. He ______________ at a company. (work, worked, works)
  5. It ______________ heavily. (rained, raining, rains)
  6. We ______________ a meeting. (had, having, have)
  7. You ______________ a movie. (watched, watches, watch)
  8. She ______________ in the pool. (swim, swam, swims)
  9. He ______________ for his exam. (student, study, studies)
  10. I ______________ breakfast. (eating, eats, eat)
  11. They ______________ their grandparents. (visitor, visits, visit)
  12. He ______________ to music. (listened, listen, listens)
  13. We ______________ to the park. (went, going, go)
  14. She ______________ a letter. (writer, writing, writes)
  15. I ______________ coffee. (drank, drinks, drink)
  16. They ______________ video games. (plays, played, play)
  17. He ______________ to work. (drive, driving, drives)
  18. It ______________ heavily. (snowing, snowed, snows)
  19. We ______________ a trip. (taken, took, take)
  20. You ______________ a class. (attends, attended, attend)
  21. She ______________ at the party. (dance, danced, dances)
  22. He ______________ a nap. (take, taken, takes)
  23. I ______________ in the morning. (running, runs, run)
  24. They ______________ television. (watched, watching, watch)
  25. He ______________ dinner. (cooking, cooked, cooks)
  26. We ______________ a picnic. (had, has, have)
  27. You ______________ the guitar. (plays, played, play)
  28. She ______________ in the choir. (sing, sung, sings)
  29. He ______________ his bike. (riding, rider, rides)
  30. I ______________ at night. (sleeps, sleeping, sleep)

Note: The correct answers have been given in italic font.

Review of 60 sentences in present indefinite tense, examples

Below are 60 interesting and commonly used sentences in present indefinite tense. You can practice with them by making negative, interrogative, negative interrogative, tag questions and other sentences as mentioned above. This will help you understand this tense in a more effective manner.

  1. I travel the world for a living
  2. She paints abstract art
  3. They design sustainable buildings
  4. He builds custom motorcycles
  5. It blooms with colourful flowers every spring
  6. We explore ancient ruins
  7. You create digital music
  8. She trains for a marathon
  9. He studies the stars as an astronomer
  10. I run a small business
  11. They film various documentaries
  12. He writes poetry
  13. We compose classical music
  14. She performs stand-up comedy
  15. I photograph wildlife
  16. They code virtual reality software
  17. He cooks fusion cuisine
  18. It shines with radiant auroras in the winter
  19. We race cars professionally
  20. You brew craft beer
  21. She creates fashion designs
  22. He sculpts in marble
  23. I teach English abroad
  24. They produce independent films
  25. He studies psychology
  26. We develop mobile games
  27. You design 3D models
  28. She plays the cello in a symphony
  29. He practices parkour
  30. I build robots for fun.
  31. She sings beautifully.
  32. He plays the guitar well.
  33. They walk to work every day.
  34. I think before I speak.
  35. She reads a book every night before bed.
  36. He writes poetry in his free time.
  37. They watch TV for hours on end.
  38. I listen to music while I work.
  39. She cooks dinner for her family.
  40. He works as a software engineer.
  41. They study at the library.
  42. I run 5 miles every morning.
  43. She paints as a hobby.
  44. He travels frequently for business.
  45. They speak multiple languages.
  46. I swim in the ocean every summer.
  47. She dances ballet professionally.
  48. He rides his bike to work.
  49. They watch the sunset every evening.
  50. I volunteer at the local animal shelter.
  51. She takes photographs of nature.
  52. He plays chess competitively.
  53. They hike in the mountains on weekends.
  54. I shop for groceries at the farmer’s market.
  55. She writes in a journal every day.
  56. He teaches English as a second language.
  57. They play video games together.
  58. I build furniture as a hobby.
  59. She studies for her exams diligently.
  60. I drink coffee every morning.

There is a wealth of information available in the simple present tense on the internet. But for your true guidance, we are giving here some common resources that people seek related to this tense:

  1. Grammar Websites: Numerous websites provide comprehensive explanations, examples, and exercises to help learners understand and use the present indefinite tense correctly.
  2. Online Courses: Platforms like Coursera, Udemy, and edX offer various English grammar courses, including modules or lessons dedicated to the simple present tense. These courses often provide interactive learning experiences, quizzes, and assignments.
  3. Language Learning Apps: Mobile applications such as Duolingo, Babbel, and Rosetta Stone offer language courses and exercises covering different aspects of grammar, including the present indefinite tense.
  4. YouTube Tutorials: Many language enthusiasts and educators create video tutorials on YouTube, explaining grammar concepts like the simple present tense. These videos often provide clear explanations, examples, and practice exercises.
  5. Grammar Books and E-books: There are numerous grammar books available, both in physical and digital formats, that cover the fundamentals of English grammar, including the present indefinite tense. Books by renowned grammar experts like Raymond Murphy and Betty Azar are popular choices.
  6. Online Forums and Communities: Language learning forums like Reddit’s r/EnglishLearning or language exchange platforms like iTalki often have threads or discussions dedicated to grammar topics. Users can ask questions, seek clarification, and engage with fellow learners and teachers.

References:

  1. EnglishClub – Tenses: EnglishClub offers a comprehensive guide to English tenses, including explanations, examples, and interactive exercises. Visit their website at: https://www.englishclub.com/grammar/verb-tenses.htm
  2. Grammarly – Verb Tenses: Grammarly’s website provides a clear overview of English verb tenses, with explanations, examples, and usage tips. You can access their resources here: https://www.grammarly.com/blog/verb-tenses/
  3. British Council – Verb Tenses: The British Council’s website offers a range of materials and interactive activities to help learners understand and practice English verb tenses. Explore their resources at: https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/grammar/intermediate-to-upper-intermediate/verb-patterns
  4. Englishpage.com – Verb Tenses Tutorial: Englishpage.com provides a comprehensive tutorial on English verb tenses, covering each tense in detail with explanations and interactive quizzes. You can access their tutorial here: https://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbtenseintro.html
  5. Perfect English Grammar – Tenses: Perfect English Grammar offers a variety of resources, including explanations, examples, and exercises, to help learners master English tenses. Visit their website at: https://www.perfect-english-grammar.com/tenses.html
We recommend some popular books that cover English tenses and grammar in general. Here are a few recommendations:
  1. “English Grammar in Use” by Raymond Murphy – This book is a comprehensive guide to English grammar, including detailed explanations and exercises for each grammar point, including tenses.
  2. “Understanding and Using English Grammar” by Betty Schrampfer Azar and Stacy A. Hagen – This book provides a thorough overview of English grammar, including tenses, with clear explanations and ample examples.
  3. “Practical English Usage” by Michael Swan – This book is a practical reference guide for English learners and covers a wide range of grammar topics, including tenses, in a clear and concise manner.
  4. “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Grammar and Style” by Laurie E. Rozakis – This book offers a beginner-friendly approach to grammar, including tenses, with explanations, examples, and exercises.
  5. “Grammar in Plain English” by Harriet Diamond and Phyllis Dutwin – This book presents grammar rules, including tenses, in a straightforward and accessible manner, making it suitable for self-study.

Written by M Manawar Zia

He has extensive expertise in strategic marketing and business development, backed by over two decades of leadership in top-tier multinational organizations. His track record includes successful implementation of marketing best practices, alignment with organizational objectives, and leading high-performing teams. Additionally, Manawar hold ISO certifications and have received academic awards in fields such as marketing management, organizational behavior, and socio-economic studies.

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